/javascript" src="../static/js/analytics.js"> CalTrade Report - 24 -Hour Maritime Security Rules Expanded Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, ocean shipping, container cargo, imports, documentation, mainfests - 24 -Hour Maritime Security Rules Expanded - Effectively immediately, the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection will penalize and fine carriers that don'../">CalTrade Report Asia Quake Victims The US Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is expanding enforcement of the "24-hour rule" that requires advance cargo declarations for vessels sailing from foreign ports to the US. - The US Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is expanding enforcement of the "24-hour rule" that requires advance cargo declarations for vessels sailing from foreign ports to the US. - 24 -Hour Maritime Security Rules Expanded Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, ocean shipping, container cargo, imports, documentation, mainfests - 24 -Hour Maritime Security Rules Expanded

 

Tuesday, June 13, 2006

 

Become a CalTrade Member--It's Free!
Front Page
Page Two
PR Newswire
Opinion
Profiles
Trade Leads
Calendar
Mission
Editor
Press Releases
Partner Orgs
Advertise Opp.
Contact Us
Int.Time Clock
Currency Calc
Cal Links
Free Services


Our Car

Front Page

E-mail PagePrint Version



24 -Hour Maritime Security Rules Expanded

Effectively immediately, the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection will penalize and fine carriers that don't provide adequate? cargo manifest information.

WASHINGTON, DC - The US Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is expanding enforcement of the "24-hour rule" that requires advance cargo declarations for vessels sailing from foreign ports to the US.

The move is effective immediately and the CBP said it would begin issuing "Do Not Load" messages for carriers that fail to provide adequate cargo descriptions, and impose monetary penalties for late submissions.

In addition, the use of such long-used, but nonetheless vague, cargo descriptions a "Freight-All-Kinds (FAK)," "Said-To-Contain," or "General Merchandise" "will not be tolerated."

Previous enforcement efforts had focused only on "significant" violations of the 24-hour rule, which became effective in December 2002, according to a spokesman for the CBP.

Starting May 15, CBP will issue "Do Not Load" messages for clear violations of the name and address requirement for cargo recipients and will impose monetary penalties for foreign cargo that does not have a valid description and was loaded without providing US officials 24-hour advance notice.

For example, consignee fields left blank, or the use of "To Order" and "To Order of Shipper" without corresponding information in the consignee field and notify party field, or consignee name with no address, incomplete address or invalid address are not acceptable.

Carriers may then be assessed a $5,000 penalty for first violations and $10,000 for any subsequent violations, the agency said.

Non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs) may be assessed liquidated damages in the amount of $5,000. Every subsequent violation will also be $5,000.

The spokesman said the CBP had reviewed more than 2.4 million bills of lading between February 2 and April 29 and that about 260 containers with inadequate cargo descriptions were denied loading for violation of the 24-hour rule.

Most of these violations were resolved in time for the shipment to make its original voyage, according to the news release.

Members of the trade community can email their questions to CBP at traderelations@customs.treas.gov.

The CBP - which became a component of the Department of Homeland Security on March 1 - is also working with the Treasury Advisory Committee on the Commercial Operations of the US Customs Service (COAC) to implement the rule.


Go back, or read the latest Front Page stories:

US Seeks Stronger Ties With Brazil

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/13/06 – Rebounding from the failure to craft a Free Trade Area of the Americas pact, the Bush Administration is aiming at strengthening trade ties with Brazil in an effort to counter China’s fast-growing economic influence in Latin America; China should not only be seen as an export market with 1.3 billion consumers, but also as a nation of 1.3 billion ''new competitors,'' says US Secretary of Commerce Carlos Guittierez.


US Threatens WTO Action Against China

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/10/06 – The White House is threatening to slap China with a World Trade Organization case unless Beijing responds quickly to US concerns over its lack of action on securing intellectual property rights for US products; talks on bringing the WTO case are at a ''very advanced stage,'' according to a high level official in the Office of the US trade Representative.


High Hopes for Central American Trade Pact

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/08/06 – The US -Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) still faces some hurdles, but could become a reality ''very soon,'' according to Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick; the issues relating to government procurement, intellectual property rights and agriculture still need to be worked through, says the former US Trade Representative following a session of the Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.





 

 


Web Design & Development by Turn-It-Digital in Los Angeles