/javascript" src="../static/js/analytics.js"> CalTrade Report - House Rejects US-Mexico Truck Proposal Mexican trucks, CalTrade Report, North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. Department of Transportation - House Rejects US-Mexico Truck Proposal - Legislators demand strict safety rules for Mexican trucks operating on US highways CalTrade Report Asia Quake Victims 09/28/04 - In a lopsided 339-70 vote, the US House of Representatives last week approved an amendment to a $90 billion transportation-spending bill that would prohibit the Department of Transportation from granting a two-year exemption from certain safety rules to Mexican trucks and buses that were not certified as meeting US safety and environmental standards at time of manufacture; the exemption was originally adopted by the White House in 2002 to counter charges of discrimination from Mexico. - 09/28/04 - In a lopsided 339-70 vote, the US House of Representatives last week approved an amendment to a $90 billion transportation-spending bill that would prohibit the Department of Transportation from granting a two-year exemption from certain safety rules to Mexican trucks and buses that were not certified as meeting US safety and environmental standards at time of manufacture; the exemption was originally adopted by the White House in 2002 to counter charges of discrimination from Mexico. - House Rejects US-Mexico Truck Proposal Mexican trucks, CalTrade Report, North American Free Trade Agreement, U.S. Department of Transportation - House Rejects US-Mexico Truck Proposal

 

Tuesday, June 13, 2006

 

Become a CalTrade Member--It's Free!
Front Page
Page Two
PR Newswire
Opinion
Profiles
Trade Leads
Calendar
Mission
Editor
Press Releases
Partner Orgs
Advertise Opp.
Contact Us
Int.Time Clock
Currency Calc
Cal Links
Free Services


Our Car

Front Page

E-mail PagePrint Version



House Rejects US-Mexico Truck Proposal

Legislators demand strict safety rules for Mexican trucks operating on US highways

WASHINGTON, DC - 09/28/04 - The US House of Representatives has voted overwhelmingly to challenge a Bush Administration proposal to ease restrictions on Mexican trucks operating on roads in the US.

In a 339-70 vote late last week, House members approved an amendment to a $90 billion transportation-spending bill that would prohibit the Department of Transportation (DOT) from granting a two-year exemption from certain safety rules to trucks and buses that were not certified as meeting US safety and environmental standards at time of manufacture.

The exemption was adopted by the Bush Administration in March 2002 in response to repeated charges from Mexico that the US was discriminating against the Mexican trucking industry.

The White House action also came in response to a 2001 North American Free Agreement (NAFTA) arbitration panel ruling that US restrictions on Mexican trucks violated the pact.

Due to ongoing legal challenges, the exemptions were not implemented, and language in the transportation bill, as approved by the House, would prevent the Bush Administration from putting them into action.

The transportation bill also must be passed by the Senate before a final bill can go to the president for his signature or veto.

The White House did not immediately comment on the House vote, but President Bush has voiced his "strong interest" in resolving the trucking dispute with Mexico.

Some media reports have suggested that Bush would be willing to veto any measure that included the House amendment.

NAFTA - signed by the US, Canada, and Mexico in 1993 - provided for full access to US roads by Mexican trucks and buses by 2000. The Clinton Administration postponed implementation on the basis of safety and environmental concerns and restricted Mexican trucks to a commercial zone just north of the US-Mexico border.

The issue has been an irritant to US-Mexico relations ever since, and Bush Administration efforts to settle it have been hampered by court challenges and by congressional demands for environmental and safety assessment reports.

At the time the exemptions were adopted, the administration also proposed that all commercial vehicles operated in the US, including those operated by Canadian and Mexican carriers, display a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) label certifying compliance with US motor vehicle safety standards.

Even though many of the vehicles now being used by Canadian and Mexican firms were originally manufactured in compliance with those standards, vehicles intended for use outside the US would not have carried the NHTSA-required label, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Debate on the House floor focused on the labeling issue, with opponents of the amendment accusing its supporters of using a technicality to disguise simple US protectionism against Mexico.

"This does not have anything to do with the safety standards of the trucks that are traveling on the roads inside the borders of the United States," said Representative Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz).

He argued the Bush Administration's proposed DOT exemption is for labeling "at the time of assembly" and should not apply to trucks that were not originally intended for use in the US.

Those trucks "were not assembled for use in the US market so they do not have the label. It is hard now to go back and get that," he said.

Apart from the label, Kolbe argued, "every single standard that is required of the truck here in the United States has to be met by that truck coming in from Mexico."

In response, Representative Ken Oberstar (D-Minn.) defended the need for identical standards among all NAFTA countries.

US standards "are set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, inspected by the US Department of Transportation, and require a certification label," he said.

The label "means that each vehicle has been built in compliance with US standards," he said, adding that there shouldn't be "one standard for the US and another standard for trucks and buses coming in from Mexico."

Although the Mexican trucking issue must still be debated in the Senate, the lopsided House vote suggests ongoing difficulties for the Bush Administration on what has proven to be chronically contentious issue.

Go back, or read the latest Front Page stories:

US Seeks Stronger Ties With Brazil

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/13/06 – Rebounding from the failure to craft a Free Trade Area of the Americas pact, the Bush Administration is aiming at strengthening trade ties with Brazil in an effort to counter China’s fast-growing economic influence in Latin America; China should not only be seen as an export market with 1.3 billion consumers, but also as a nation of 1.3 billion ''new competitors,'' says US Secretary of Commerce Carlos Guittierez.


US Threatens WTO Action Against China

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/10/06 – The White House is threatening to slap China with a World Trade Organization case unless Beijing responds quickly to US concerns over its lack of action on securing intellectual property rights for US products; talks on bringing the WTO case are at a ''very advanced stage,'' according to a high level official in the Office of the US trade Representative.


High Hopes for Central American Trade Pact

WASHINGTON, DC – 06/08/06 – The US -Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) still faces some hurdles, but could become a reality ''very soon,'' according to Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick; the issues relating to government procurement, intellectual property rights and agriculture still need to be worked through, says the former US Trade Representative following a session of the Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.





 

 


Web Design & Development by Turn-It-Digital in Los Angeles