/javascript" src="../static/js/analytics.js"> CalTrade Report - Blanket Vessel Security Inspections Start July 1 U.S. Coast Guard, CalTrade Report, vessel security, 9/11, terrorism - Blanket Vessel Security Inspections Start July 1 - USCG may respond to security gaps with restrictions, denial of entry CalTrade Report Asia Quake Victims 04/05/04 - Under a post-9/11 law designed to protect US port facilities and waterways from terrorist attack, the Coast Guard will have authority to insure that foreign ships bound for US ports have security plans and that the plans have been properly implemented; concerns raised over ships sailing from ports that haven't complied with International Maritime Organization vessel security mandates. - 04/05/04 - Under a post-9/11 law designed to protect US port facilities and waterways from terrorist attack, the Coast Guard will have authority to insure that foreign ships bound for US ports have security plans and that the plans have been properly implemented; concerns raised over ships sailing from ports that haven't complied with International Maritime Organization vessel security mandates. - Blanket Vessel Security Inspections Start July 1 U.S. Coast Guard, CalTrade Report, vessel security, 9/11, terrorism - Blanket Vessel Security Inspections Start July 1

 

Wednesday, April 26, 2006

 

Become a CalTrade Member--It's Free!
Front Page
Page Two
PR Newswire
Opinion
Profiles
Trade Leads
Calendar
Mission
Editor
Press Releases
Partner Orgs
Advertise Opp.
Contact Us
Int.Time Clock
Currency Calc
Cal Links
Free Services


Our Car

Front Page

E-mail PagePrint Version



Blanket Vessel Security Inspections Start July 1

USCG may respond to security gaps with restrictions, denial of entry

WASHINGTON, DC - 04/05/04 - Every foreign merchant ship headed for a US port after July 1 will be boarded and inspected by the US Coast Guard (USCG) before it will be permitted to anchor or berth.
?
Under a law designed to protect US ports and waterways from terrorist attack, the Coast Guard will have authority to insure that foreign ships have security plans and that the plans have been properly implemented, said US Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thomas Collins in recent testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee.

The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code - a multilateral ship and port security code adopted by a majority of International Maritime Organization (IMO) member countries including the US - requires nations to submit port and ship security plans to their national authorities before a July 2004 deadline.

Ships from those countries should carry a security certificate issued by their respective maritime agencies, said Collins, who added that "the US is working with the IMO to help other countries comply with the new security requirements."

According to Collins, the USCG - which previously acted as part of the Department of Transportation before being shifted the Department of Homeland Security following the 9/11 terrorist attacks - is prepared to take enforcement action "against any vessel not complying with the IMO code, including additional inspections, limitations on the ship's operations and, in the most severe cases, detention and denial of entry to a US port."

In prepared testimony, he said that the Coast Guard, working with other federal agencies, plans to identify foreign ports posing a potential security risk to international maritime transportation.
?
Under the plan, Collins, who was to his post?in May 2002, told the Committee, US security teams will begin visiting foreign ports in July to assess their implementation of the IMO code. As for US ports, the USCG will complete their security assessments by the end of 2004.

Senator Bill Nelson (D-Florida) expressed particular concern about vessels coming from Caribbean ports, some of which, he said, are unlikely to meet the July 1 deadline.

Collins responded by saying that ships arriving from non-compliant foreign ports or countries that have not adopted the IMO code will be up for additional, but as for now unspecified, scrutiny.

On another issue, he said that the USCG is working with the IMO "to develop requirements for technology able to track vessels in a range of 2,000 nautical miles (the approximate distance from the US coastline a ship owner must transmit a 96-hour advance notice of ship's arrival)."

He said the Coast Guard plans to submit a proposal to the IMO on such technology within the next two months.

US Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Robert Bonner, who also testified before the Committee, said that another international security program designed to prevent terrorist attacks - the container security initiative (CSI) initiated by the agency - has been "well-received and broadly accepted" around the world.

Under bilateral CSI agreements, US Customs inspectors target US-bound high-risk cargo containers in foreign ports for additional inspections by their local counterparts.

Bonner said that by the end of 2004 more than 30 foreign ports that handle large volumes of US-bound cargo are expected to participate in CSI.

In the future, he said, when CSI expansion reaches a critical mass of broad worldwide coverage, the US may consider allowing in only those cargo containers coming from ports in the CSI network.

Go back, or read the latest Front Page stories:

WTO Negotiations Degenerate into Blame Fest

GENEVA, Switzerland – 04/24/06 – Tensions over the looming Doha Round deadline has pushed Brussels and Washington over the edge with the world’s two major trading powers pointing fingers of blame at each other over the failure to reach an acceptable agreement on the global trade in agricultural and industrial goods; the EU wants ''realism'' from the US, while Washington ''is still waiting to see an equally ambitious proposal'' from Brussels to match its six month-old offer to cut trade-distorting farm subsidies and agricultural tariffs.


Changing Trade Horses in Mid-Stream?

WASHINGTON, DC – 04/21/06 – President Bush’s decision to shift US Trade Representative Rob Portman to new duties as head of the Office of Management and Budget has drawn both criticism and praise from government officials and private sector trade analysts both at home and abroad; European Union trade officials feel the move may signal that Washington has written-off the sputtering Doha Round of global trade negotiations as ''dispensable.''


Another Hat in the LNG Terminal Ring

LOS ANGELES – 04/20/06 – For the second time in as many months, a major energy company has said it is interested in developing a liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal somewhere off the coast of Southern California; Texas-based Esperanza Energy LLC, a newly formed subsidiary of the Tidelands Oil & Gas Corp., has said it is evaluating the feasibility of developing a facility to meet the region’s growing demand for natural gas.





 

 


Web Design & Development by Turn-It-Digital in Los Angeles